Home » Barony of Cynnabar » Twill Tape Nametag Tutorial: An Idea for Newcomer-Friendly SCA Events

Twill Tape Nametag Tutorial: An Idea for Newcomer-Friendly SCA Events

photo(209)We’re having a casual revel in our barony on Sunday and many newcomers are invited and expected. To help make this a newcomer-friendly event, we’re making nametags. The standard “Hello my name is …” sticker nametag seems a little, well, mundane. So I got the idea to make simple twill tape nametags that can be pinned on to one’s garb. Twill is period! Now I doubt our ancestors ran around with their names on a bit of twill tape, but this seems like a less glaringly-modern way to wear our names. At the request of several friends who asked how this was done, I’ve made a tutorial so everyone can make them!

 

Twill Tape Nametag Materials:

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  • Card stock
  • 1″ twill tape (cotton)
  • Inkjet printer
  • Masking tape
  • Scissors
  • Fray Check

 

Twill Tape Nametag Photo Tutorial:

1. Print out the twill tape printing template (PDF file) onto your cardstock: twill-tape-printing-template

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2. Cut and tape a piece of twill tape to the indicated spot on the template. Keep your twill tape as flat and smooth as possible — if it is wrinkly or curved, iron it. Tape it down at the top and the bottom, and smooth the tape well onto the paper.

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3. Place your template with the taped twill on it into your manual feed ink jet printer. My printer has just one feed, as shown below.

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4. Download the twill tape name template, enter the name you wish to print, and print it onto your taped template. The font I’m using here is the free King Harold font, which was inspired by the embroidered lettering on the famous Bayeux Tapestry made in 1073-83. If the font does not appear correctly in the template, you will need to download and install it. If you use a different font, the easiest way is to import the template into your page layout software, type your name in whatever font you like at the appropriate size and color, then delete the template later leaving only the name to be printed.

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5. Remove the twill tape from the paper, trim it to the desired length, and coat the ends with Fray Check (twill tape will fray a lot).

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6. Iron it on high for a few minutes to heat set it.

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Voila! You have a twill tape nametag!

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What I really like about these nametags is that you can re-use them. And those who don’t wish to wear them as nametags can always sew them into the inside of their garb as an identifying mark — I really recommend this for cloaks because they tend to get left behind at events. If you’re going to put it into garb that you wash frequently, you’ll want to test it first as inkjet printers and inks are all a bit different.

Of course, if you wanted to get really fancy, you could actually embroider or even tablet weave these! That would work best if you were doing just one or a few, not 50.

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One Comments to “Twill Tape Nametag Tutorial: An Idea for Newcomer-Friendly SCA Events”

  1. Thanks for the sensible critique. Me & my neighbor were just preparing to do a little research on this. We got a grab a book from our local library but I think I learned more clear from this post. I’m very glad to see such great information being shared freely out there.

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